artist

Standing in the shadow of the moon

I was vacationing with my family in Oregon during the total solar eclipse this summer (08.21.17). We took advantage of an eclipse-related festival and attended educational / cultural events at my alma mater, Oregon State University, for a couple of days.

It was wonderfully nostalgic -- here's a photo of me in front of Fairbanks Hall, the art building, which seems almost entirely unchanged since I graduated. The atmosphere, with smells of paint and views out the old glass windows, is just as I remembered. The gallery inside was hosting a really well-conceived show, titled "Totality."

On the morning of the eclipse, we positioned ourselves in an open plaza area where we could see shadows cast by the trees and watch the sunlight project the eclipse through those openings and onto the ground, as if through a pinhole camera.

I was totally enchanted by the cast shadows that were the reverse of what we were looking at in the sky (with our special glasses on, of course).

Adjacent to the plaza was a sports court with a smooth blue surface. The images were even more distinct there, some of them looking like marbled paper. Even our shadows began to have some of those eclipse shapes in the negative spaces.

I was alternatively looking at the sun with my glasses and then taking them off to see what was happening on the ground. All the while the air was cooling as the sunlight diminished. (The white stripe bisecting the image with blue/green background is boundary line on the sports court.)

Below is a photo taken right before totality, when all the shadows of the trees went away as darkness fell mid-morning.
Just before the eclipse became total, shadows on the ground appeared that wiggled like snakes, kind of like the heat wave you see over the road when driving on a hot day. It was the glowing activity of the corona very briefly projecting itself onto us and the ground… an odd, almost dizzying sensation.

Suddenly it seemed like the moon snapped fully over the sun. I felt that I heard a sonic boom. Then it was dark above, with a glow 360 degrees around the edges of the horizon as if the sun had set not long ago... simply gorgeous. We were able to look up without the glasses during that time and try to absorb what we were seeing.

The image of the moon in front of the sun was so powerful. We were awe-struck. I feel like the image is imprinted on my brain -- I can be recall it in a very clear way. The eclipse tinted us and everything around us a metallic gray color. The shimmery glow around the moon was beautiful. Totality lasted less than two minutes and then the moon began to move off the sun. We put our glasses back on and watched the remainder of the eclipse until the sun shone fully again. I have a whole new recognition of the three dimensionality of the moon and sun in space now.

I'm wondering how experiencing the eclipse might affect my work in the future. I've always loved circles and have taught myself how to rip pretty good ones, if a little ragged, to use in my collages.

I was struck when I got home from the trip and looked anew at this collage, "Replay," made in 2012, which hangs over my desk. The correlations are rather interesting... it has a painted background with salvaged and painted papers applied on top. And yes, I ripped all those yellow-gold circle shapes and the half circle negative strips.

While the rest of the family has declared themselves to be total umbraphiles, I'm still processing this stunning experience... not sure if seeing another would diminish or enhance the power of the first experience. If you've never seen a total solar eclipse though, I believe it’s worth making the effort to get a location where you can experience totality... as my favorite commemorative t-shirt read, "Totality Worth It!"

SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave

Collage artist trading cards

Collage Artist Trading Cards, pack of 15 cards.You've heard of baseball cards, but do you know about artist trading cards (ATCs)? They are artist-made miniature works of art to collect and trade. Collecting ATCs is a popular trend right now. (An internet search of "artist trading cards" + "your city of choice" will yield information on local groups that meet to trade cards.)Along those lines but on a larger scale, the publishers of the art magazine, Kolaj, have begun issuing packs of 15 Collage Artist Trading Cards. Their goal is to further disseminate the work of contemporary fine art collage artists and to encourage people to learn about new artists. These are professionally printed cards, each measuring 5.5  x  3.5" with an image on the front and information about the collage and the artist on the back.I'm happy to be included in Pack One of the trading cards (issued late 2013) along with international collage artists Bev Butkow, Ewan Aparicio, Holly Savas, Jeni Bate, Joe Castro, Kamee Abrahamian, Lita Kenyon, Mongobi-Bibbiana Mele, Nikki Soppelsa, Pierre-Paul Pariseau, Ross Carron, Sara Winkler, Stephen Tierney, and Vesna Vrdoljak.If you'd like to start a collection of your own, the cards are available for $10/pack here from Maison Kasini.A great collection of stamps arrived along with my pack of Collage Artist Trading Cards. 

Composed Landscape original collages

Composed Landscapes… five original collages by Janice McDonald in the IMA boardroom.

Here are some photos of the collages arranged on the end wall of the IMA boardroom. The room features a huge wood-slab conference table and views to Denver's Union Station along one side and the office interior on the other. It's an exciting place to have an office… the renaissance of Denver's transit system is coming to fruition right next door.These five original collages were scanned and digitally enlarged 900% to produce the floor to ceiling stairwell murals pictured in earlier posts. They are each 12" wide and of varying heights to account for the different floor to ceiling heights in the stairwell.I'm really thrilled that my collages are highlighted in this gorgeous space!View from elevator lobby across interior stair to glass-walled boardroom.

Stairwell debut

Collage on the level five landing and the artist, Janice McDonald.IMA Financial Group moved into their brand new building mid-December and the grand opening celebration was last night. It was a lovely event and I'm honored to be included in the art collection. It was fabulous to see all the artwork and furnishings in place and talk to people who use "my" stairwell everyday! It's been very enthusiastically received. The sound adds so much to the experience. (Eventually I'll be able to post some video so you can get a better sense of it.)doorFrom the outside fire door, Stairwell 2 looks like the usual boring and slightly scary concrete emergency exit… but once inside, people are surprised to see that it has been finished with laminate floors, paint, lighting, artwork and sound to create an environment that's fun to be in. Kudos to IMA for encouraging their employees to take the stairs! And for commissioning me to do such a challenging project. I've loved working on this one.Confluence Denver ran an article about the opening that mentions the stairwell in particular and includes more photos. I wish I had taken pictures of some of the food that was served… I especially liked their celebratory cocktail: jalapeño-infused vodka with pink lemonade. :) Very festive indeed!